San Diego Is On The Verge Of Something Big

The San Diego region is on the verge of something big

Millions of people call San Diego County home and for decades, the primary way most of us have moved around the region has been driving. That is about to change.

A Legacy of Failure

Unlike major metropolitan areas across the country and the world, San Diego has not invested in a modern, convenient transit system that enables people to easily get around without relying on a car. In fact, San Diegans are currently dependent on driving. For many who have lived here any length of time, we have seen traffic get worse and worse.

Also seriously lacking in San Diego, a region truly made for outdoor enjoyment, is a safe, extensive network of bike paths connecting communities.

And, for many low-income and communities of color, pollution from intrusive freeways has threatened health for decades. Our air quality consistently receives dismal grades from the American Lung Association. Don’t believe us, you can take a look for yourself using the CalEnviroScreen 4.0 to help you identify communities disproportionately burdened by multiple sources of pollution.

For residents who may not be able to drive or access a car, basic trips like getting to work, school or medical appointments could mean hours of travel with multiple transfers between buses and trolleys.

A New Vision

Things are not this way because they have to be. They are the result of years of transportation decisions by the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) but with new leadership and vision, our region is poised for major change.

SANDAG is coming out with a new plan that will change the way transportation looks in San Diego. Picture biking across town on a shaded and protected path, or zipping home on a trolley that cuts your commute time in half.  These are the types of outcomes that the new plan lays the groundwork for. The plan is meant to bring San Diego into the 21st century by making transit a better choice than driving. It is an opportunity for SANDAG board members to be truly visionary with a community investment in significant, long overdue upgrades and improvements.

Building Momentum

A number of board members have recently supported a Resolution that commits to incorporating things like health, equity, climate, and good jobs into the plan, which makes us seriously question those members of the board still wanting to cling to our current car-dependent system.

There is still a lot to understand about the plan specifics but the release of SANDAG’s 2021 Regional Plan marks an exciting new chapter for transportation in San Diego County. It also presents a milestone moment for elected leaders to finally abandon obsolete practices and bring America’s Finest City – and our region – into a healthier future where all residents can access safe, convenient, affordable transportation.

Keep San Diego Moving in the Right Direction

You can help keep San Diego moving in the right direction by speaking up at an important meeting. On May 28th the SANDAG Board will hear a presentation and discuss the 2021 Regional Plan. You may speak during public comment in support of the new vision for our transportation future.

Did you see these other posts?

Regional Plan Draft Environmental Impact Report Out for Review

Regional Plan Draft Environmental Impact Report Out for Review

Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) for the 2021 Regional Plan As part of the development of the 2021 Regional Plan, The San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG), as lead agency under the California Environmental Quality Act, has prepared a Draft...

Analyzing the 2021 Regional Plan

Analyzing the 2021 Regional Plan

On May 28, SANDAG released the Draft 2021 Regional Plan, including the Draft Air Quality Conformity analysis and the Sustainable Communities Strategy (SCS) for public comment on May 28, 2021. The closing date for public comments is August 6, 2021. A response to each...

Turning Stormwater into an Asset

Turning Stormwater into an Asset

San Diegans love their beaches and bays. Most days you can see people playing in the water in many ways – swimming, surfing, snorkeling, diving, fishing, and more. But for 72 hours after it rains, it is another story. Closed beaches and empty lineups testify to the hazards of playing in polluted stormwater.

Get in touch